Test Drive the Crock-Pot

Simplest recipe I can find. Onions, carrots, celery, salt, pepper, basil, white wine, chicken. Drop the veggies in, sprinkle the seasoning, pour in the wine, cook 4.5 hours on high. Dad gets to be the guinea pig 😉

A Chicken In Every Pot

Test Drive the Crock-Pot

Simplest recipe I can find. Onions, carrots, celery, salt, pepper, basil, white wine, chicken. Drop the veggies in, sprinkle the seasoning, pour in the wine, cook 4.5 hours on high. Dad gets to be the guinea pig 😉

A Chicken In Every Pot

Crock Pot

New Crock-Pot crockpot. 7 qt, 20 hour, 2 speed, stays “warm” after timer counts down. Got a mini crockpot too!

Crock-Pot SCCPVC709-S

The mini heats water to 160 after 30 minute (from about 90). Will build “experimental” bean dip tomorrow for football games.

The maxi on low – start water at 90. 15 minutes, 95. 30 minutes 108. 60 minutes 125. 120 minutes 171. Was going to let it “warm down” but have decided to see where we get after 5 hours. I can hold my hands 1/2 inch from the metal sides quite easily. Side handles are warm, would probably use pot holder just in case. Lid handle can easily be held bare-handed.

Tomorrow, we test drive a chicken. That’s already on the schedule, but won’t get the beer can treatment 😉

Have to love Food City – 1 bunch celery, 1/2 lb. carrots, 1.5 lb. brown onions, .88 lb. white potatoes, .89 lb. roma tomatoes, bag rebate 😉 grand total 2.74. Had almost enough change to get a fine Bear Republic “Racer India Pale Ale” for the afternoon reflection time 😉

Crock Pot

New Crock-Pot crockpot. 7 qt, 20 hour, 2 speed, stays “warm” after timer counts down. Got a mini crockpot too!

Crock-Pot SCCPVC709-S

The mini heats water to 160 after 30 minute (from about 90). Will build “experimental” bean dip tomorrow for football games.

The maxi on low – start water at 90. 15 minutes, 95. 30 minutes 108. 60 minutes 125. 120 minutes 171. Was going to let it “warm down” but have decided to see where we get after 5 hours. I can hold my hands 1/2 inch from the metal sides quite easily. Side handles are warm, would probably use pot holder just in case. Lid handle can easily be held bare-handed.

Tomorrow, we test drive a chicken. That’s already on the schedule, but won’t get the beer can treatment 😉

Have to love Food City – 1 bunch celery, 1/2 lb. carrots, 1.5 lb. brown onions, .88 lb. white potatoes, .89 lb. roma tomatoes, bag rebate 😉 grand total 2.74. Had almost enough change to get a fine Bear Republic “Racer India Pale Ale” for the afternoon reflection time 😉

USDA Revises Recommended Cooking Temperature for All Whole Cuts of Meat, Including Pork, to 145 ºF

"With a single temperature for all whole cuts of meat and uniform 3 minute stand time, we believe it will be much easier for consumers to remember and result in safer food preparation," said Under Secretary Elisabeth Hagen. "Now there will only be 3 numbers to remember: 145 for whole meats, 160 for ground meats and 165 for all poultry."

via USDA Revises Recommended Cooking Temperature for All Whole Cuts of Meat, Including Pork, to 145 ºF.

It’s about time!

Beef Roast Basics and Cooking Tables for One or Several Roasts– Ellen's Kitchen

A large beef roast is the simplest of all party entrees to prepare well. Select it carefully and cook it right and you will hear nothing but praise from your diners.

via Beef Roast Basics and Cooking Tables for One or Several Roasts– Ellen’s Kitchen.

I wanted to find out if 2 roasts (e.g. 6 pounds each) takes the same amount of time to roast as a single roast (e.g. 12 pounds).

The answer is: a bit more time than it takes for one.

I have 2 of unequal size. The meat thermometer checks the smaller one first.

Phooey – combine the 2 weights then compute as a single roast. I guess if I had 56 lbs. of roast it might be different. A 7 + a 6 took the same time as a 13.

The Finger Test to Check the Doneness of Meat

The Finger Test to Check the Doneness of Meat:

There are two basic methods to test for how done your meat is while you are cooking it – use a meat thermometer, or press on the meat with your finger tips. The problem with the meat thermometer approach is that when you poke a hole into the meat with a thermometer, it can let juices escape, juices that you would rather have stay in the meat. For this reason, most experienced cooks rely on a “finger test” method, especially on steaks (whole roasts are better tested with a thermometer).

(Via Simply Recipes.)

This has been my method of testing for years. The examples and pictures show the technique well.